Program Description

 

This option provides students with opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions required for effective professional practice in the field of outdoor recreation and education. The program blends traditional didactic and field-based learning opportunities to create a unique educational experience for students in the major. Students have opportunities to develop foundational knowledge related to the discipline, technical proficiency in various outdoor adventure pursuits, expeditionary and wilderness travel experience, and programming, leadership and teaching ability that can be applied in a wide variety of professional domains. General topic areas in the program include outdoor leadership, environmental interpretation, parks and protected areas management, ecotourism, and adventure programming. Emphasis in the curriculum is placed on understanding and appreciating the interconnection of humans and the broader ecological frameworks in which they live as well as the role of natural environments in sustaining human health and wellbeing. Students can earn a number of professional certifications and certificates through academic coursework in the program.

About Ohio University

In 1803, Ohio became a state and on February 18, 1804, the Ohio General Assembly passed an act establishing "The Ohio University." The University opened in 1808 with one building, three students, and one professor, Jacob Lindley. One of the first two graduates of the University, Thomas Ewing, later became a United States senator and distinguished himself as cabinet member or advisor to four presidents. Twenty-four years after its founding, in 1828, Ohio University conferred an A.B. degree on John Newton Templeton, its first black graduate and only the third black man to graduate from a college in the United States. In 1873, Margaret Boyd received her B.A. degree and became the first woman to graduate from the University. Soon after, the institution graduated its first international alumnus, Saki Taro Murayama of Japan, in 1895.